As someone who was a part of the hustle culture at a previous company, I think it's largely because you don't want to reconcile that all the sweat, blood, tears, etc you've burned on the product weren't worth it. It HAS to be worth it, and if you don't believe it then you're the problem, not the company (oof). There was also the fear of not being seen as a team player and being seen as "less than" if you begin to slow your pace.

That's at least how I used to rationalize it to myself. Was verrrrry wrong and was much happier and healthier once I jumped ship.

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I think this is one of the hardest pieces to replicate in a remote environment, so nicely said and a good breakdown of how to tactically go about this.

I do think standups can still be productive and helpful when remote (we go 3 times a week around noon EST) as long as it is well facilitated and folks know what to bring to the table. Expectation-setting up-front seems to be where most teams fail on this and end up butchering the intention of the standup.

For me, standups should make sure everyone is aligned on the direction they're going for that day, all else should be public in the project channel so teammates have visibility.

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John Hartley

John Hartley

Engineering leader with a passion for building and growing teams. Writing mostly about leadership and management in the tech industry. Mentor @ Plato.